emotional roller coaster

The Emotional Roller Coaster of Living with Chronic Illness

Written by Cheryl Young, MAMFT

Being diagnosed with chronic illness can often feel like you are on an emotional roller coaster ride!

Here are 9 that are often relatable to both the individual and family members after a diagnosis
has been made:

1. Relief

  • “Finally an answer, I’m not crazy after all!”
  • “At least now I can build a plan of action and keep from getting worse. It sucks
    not to know!
  • “Well, at least it’s not going to kill me. So I have that going for me. It could be
    much worse!”

2. Jealousy

  • “Why do I feel so limited by my illness while others I know with a chronic
    condition seem to do just fine?”
  • “How unfair! My friends and family are getting to follow through with all the
    plans they made for their future – now I have this roadblock in front of me!”
  • “Why don’t other people understand – I may look just fine, but they can’t see
    the invisible symptoms I am feeling like fatigue, depression and anxiety”.

3. Impatience

  • “Why all the long waits for a doctor’s appointment – it feels like they just don’t
    care about me!”
  • “When will I know if this medication is actually working?”
  • “How come they don’t have a cure by now?”

4. Disappointment

  • “I feel like crap but my doctor says I am fine.
  • “I give up! Why bother eating healthy and going to PT – nothing is making me
    feel better!”
  • “I used to have dreams and ambitions. Now I can no longer do the things I
    wanted to do with my life. What do I do now?”

5. Exhaustion

  • “All I do is think about my condition – I just wish I could take one day or even one
    hour off from all the worrying!”
  • “I hate having to rely on others all the time for help – I worry about adding more
    stress to their lives too!”
  • “I am so anxious and worried that I can’t sleep, I can’t concentrate, and I have mood swings all the time.”
  • “There are so many unpredictable problems -I am worn out by all the emotional ups and downs.”

6. Loss of Identity

  • “Do I have any choices anymore? I feel like my body has betrayed me and I am
    no longer who I once was.”
  • “I have lost sight of who I actually am as a whole human being.”
  • “Can I still have a career? Will I still be able to perform my job without asking for
    help?
  • “Can I still find love as a person with this condition? Will I ever be able to enjoy
    romance, friendship, sex or care for my own family?”

7. Fatalism

  • “My doctors do not care about me, they just want to collect my insurance – they
    probably don’t even want to find a cure.”
  • “Things aren’t getting better…why do I even bother trying to fight this disease?”
  • “So much for living mindfully. I may as well live on the edge because nothing I do
    for myself makes a difference.”

8. Withdrawl

  • “I don’t talk to friends or family or coworkers anymore because it’s too difficult
    to explain – they wouldn’t understand anyway.”
  • “I don’t work or take part in my usual activities anymore because I can’t perform
    them the way I used to and it is embarrassing. I used to be good at these things.”
  • “I don’t want to leave the house anymore because it is physically too hard, there
    are too many obstacles out in the world for people with disabilities and people
    can be cruel and stare at me.”

9. Getting Perspective (Gratitude)

  • “I am grateful to my friends and family who through this journey have helped me
    by being good listeners and also sharing their feelings in a way that helps me
    clarify and value my own journey.”